The Whitest Privilege

San Diego school district tells teachers "you are racist."

San Diego Unified School District is forcing teachers to attend “white privilege” training, in which teachers are told “you are racist” and “you are upholding racist ideas, structures, and policies.”

The training begins with a “land acknowledgement,” in which the teachers are asked to accept that they are colonizers living on stolen Native American land. Then they are told they will experience “guilt, anger, apathy, [and] closed-mindedness” because of their “white fragility.”

After watching clips of Robin DiAngelo and Ibram Kendi, the trainers tell the teachers: “you are racist,” “you are upholding racist ideas, structures, and policies,” and that they must commit to becoming “antiracist” in the classroom. They must submit to the new racial orthodoxy.

The teachers are told that they are part of an oppressive white power structure. The trainers claim that “white people in America hold most of the [power]” and that white teachers have an “ability to thrive” that is “being preserved at every level of power.”

Finally, teachers are told they must become “antiracist” activists. They must “confront and examine [their] white privilege,” “acknowledge when [they] feel white fragility,” and “teach others to see their privilege.” They must turn their schools into activist organizations.

Here’s the problem: only 47% of San Diego Unified students reach proficiency in reading and math. Teaching “white fragility” will do nothing to help students improve their academic abilities—it will only serve activist teachers who want to shift the blame to “systemic racism.”

Parents should be up in arms: public schools should be designed to serve the public good, not the private ideological fantasies of far-left activists. We need to teach students basic reading, writing, and arithmetic—not white fragility, intersectionality, and antiracism.

Original Source Document

Christopher F. Rufo is the director of Discovery Institute’s Center on Wealth & Poverty. He has directed four documentaries for PBS and is currently a contributing editor for City Journal, where he covers homelessness, addiction, mental illness, crime, and other afflictions.

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